Tag Archives: ssms

How to get MS SQL Server job history using a stored procedure

In a previous article (see article) I provided simple queries to return the server’s job history. It’s only natural that when you find yourself running the same script over and over again eventually you’ll get around to turning it into a stored procedure.

Well today was the day.

You can use the script below to create the Stored Procedure usp_GetJobHistory.

To deploy the SP to your instance you’ll need to replace the text PLACEHOLDER with the name of the database you’ll be deploying to. Ideally you should have a utility or administration database rather than deploying to Master.

The SP has 5 parameters.

Parameter Datatype Options Definition
@DaysToPull INT Any Number How many days of history you want
working back from today
@Status VARCHAR One of the following: All’, ‘Succeeded’, ‘Failed’,
‘Retried’, ‘Cancelled’, NULL
Will limited the rows returned
based on the status of the entry
@SortOrder VARCHAR ASC or DESC The occurrence order i.e. oldest to newest
@JobName VARCHAR Any Text Used in a LIKE operator to find jobs containing that text
@ReturnSql BIT 0, 1 or NULL Returns the SQL you can modify or
run to return the history

Example command:

Create the SQL code to return the job history for jobs containing the work backup that failed in the past day sorted by newest to oldest.

EXEC dbo.GetJobHistory @DaysToPull = 1
,@SortOrder = ‘DESC’
,@Status = ‘Failed’
,@JobName = ‘Backup’
,@ReturnSql = 1

Tip: you could use this to create a SSRS report that could be published daily to notify stakeholders of any job failures.

-- REPLACE PLACEHOLDER
USE [PLACEHOLDER];
GO

IF OBJECT_ID('[usp_GetJobHistory]') IS NULL
	EXEC ('CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.[usp_GetJobHistory] AS SELECT 1')
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[usp_GetJobHistory] @DaysToPull INT
	,@Status VARCHAR(9) = NULL
	,@SortOrder VARCHAR(4) = NULL
	,@JobName VARCHAR(256) = NULL
	,@ReturnSql BIT = NULL
AS
BEGIN
	-- =============================================
	-- Author:      Bloggins
	-- Create date: 20170420
	-- Description: <Query to retrieve job history bypassing SSMS inbuilt viewer>
	-- Website: https://techtidbytes.wordpress.com/
	-- =============================================
	SET NOCOUNT ON

	BEGIN TRY
		-- Variable Declarations 
		DECLARE @PreviousDate DATETIME
		DECLARE @Year VARCHAR(4)
		DECLARE @Month VARCHAR(2)
		DECLARE @MonthPre VARCHAR(2)
		DECLARE @Day VARCHAR(2)
		DECLARE @DayPre VARCHAR(2)
		DECLARE @FinalDate INT
		DECLARE @StatusClause AS VARCHAR(255)
		DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

		IF @SortOrder IS NULL
			OR (
				@SortOrder <> 'ASC'
				AND @SortOrder <> 'DESC'
				)
		BEGIN
			SET @SortOrder = 'ASC'
		END

		IF @Status = 'All'
			OR @Status IS NULL
			OR (
				@Status <> 'All'
				AND @Status <> 'Failed'
				AND @Status <> 'Succeeded'
				AND @Status <> 'Retried'
				AND @Status <> 'Cancelled'
				)
		BEGIN
			SET @StatusClause = '0, 1, 2, 3'
		END
		ELSE IF @Status = 'Failed'
		BEGIN
			SET @StatusClause = '0'
		END
		ELSE IF @Status = 'Succeeded'
		BEGIN
			SET @StatusClause = '1'
		END
		ELSE IF @Status = 'Retried'
		BEGIN
			SET @StatusClause = '2'
		END
		ELSE IF @Status = 'Cancelled'
		BEGIN
			SET @StatusClause = '3'
		END

		SET @PreviousDate = DATEADD(dd, - @DaysToPull, GETDATE())
		SET @Year = DATEPART(yyyy, @PreviousDate)

		SELECT @MonthPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(mm, @PreviousDate))

		SELECT @Month = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@MonthPre + 1000000000)), 2)

		SELECT @DayPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(dd, @PreviousDate))

		SELECT @Day = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@DayPre + 1000000000)), 2)

		SET @FinalDate = CAST(@Year + @Month + @Day AS INT)
		/*RunDuration FORMAT (DD:HH:MM:SS)*/
		SET @Sql = '
SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY h.instance_id ' + @SortOrder + ' ) AS Row
	,h.Server AS ServerName
	,s.database_name AS DbName
	,j.name AS JobName
	,s.step_name AS StepName
	,h.step_id AS StepId
	,CASE 
		WHEN h.run_status = 0
			THEN ''Failed''
		WHEN h.run_status = 1
			THEN ''Succeeded''
		WHEN h.run_status = 2
			THEN ''Retried''
		WHEN h.run_status = 3
			THEN ''Cancelled''
		END AS RunStatus
	,MSDB.DBO.AGENT_DATETIME(h.run_date, h.run_time) AS RunTime
	,STUFF(STUFF(STUFF(RIGHT(REPLICATE(''0'', 8) + CAST(h.run_duration AS VARCHAR(8)), 8), 3, 0, '':''), 6, 0, '':''), 9, 0, '':'') AS RunDuration
	,h.sql_severity AS SqlSeverity
	,h.message AS MessageReturned
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobhistory h
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobs j ON h.job_id = j.job_id
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobsteps s ON j.job_id = s.job_id
	AND h.step_id = s.step_id
WHERE h.run_status IN (' + @StatusClause + ')
	AND h.run_date > ' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(255), @FinalDate)

		IF @JobName IS NOT NULL
		BEGIN
			SET @Sql = @Sql + '
AND j.name LIKE ' + '''' + '%' + @JobName + '%' + '''' + ''
		END

		SET @Sql = @Sql + '
ORDER BY h.instance_id ' + @SortOrder

		IF @ReturnSql = 1
		BEGIN
			PRINT (@Sql)
		END
		ELSE
		BEGIN
			EXEC (@Sql)
		END
	END TRY

	BEGIN CATCH
		PRINT 'error!'

		DECLARE @error_number AS INTEGER
		DECLARE @error_message AS VARCHAR(400)

		SET @error_number = error_number()
		SET @error_message = left(error_message(), 400)

		PRINT 'error_message: ' + @error_message
	END CATCH
END

How to lookup SQL Server Jobs and get the job history with a query

Sometimes job history just won’t load in SQL Server Management Studio for one reason or another. One of the main reasons is that there are too many entries in the sysjobhistory table. The article here will help you resolve that problem. For a more immediate answer to the data you are looking for, like most things with SSMS, you can query the tables that contain this data directly.

For a permanent solution to bypassing SSMS I recommend using this stored procedure. If you just want a quick query see below.

If you want to get a job history for everything that has run over the last 7 days you can run the query below. Simply change the 7 to another number to go further back in time by days.

-- Variable Declarations 
DECLARE @PreviousDate DATETIME
DECLARE @Year VARCHAR(4)
DECLARE @Month VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @MonthPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @Day VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @DayPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @FinalDate INT


-- Initialize Variables 
SET @PreviousDate = DATEADD(dd, - 7, GETDATE()) -- Last 7 days  
SET @Year = DATEPART(yyyy, @PreviousDate)

SELECT @MonthPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(mm, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Month = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@MonthPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SELECT @DayPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(dd, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Day = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@DayPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SET @FinalDate = CAST(@Year + @Month + @Day AS INT)

-- Pull Job History 
SELECT j.[name]
	,s.step_name
	,h.step_id
	,MSDB.DBO.AGENT_DATETIME(h.run_date, h.run_time) AS run_time
	,STUFF(STUFF(STUFF(RIGHT(REPLICATE('0', 8) + CAST(h.run_duration AS VARCHAR(8)), 8), 3, 0, ':'), 6, 0, ':'), 9, 0, ':') 'run_duration (DD:HH:MM:SS)  '
	,h.run_status
	,h.sql_severity
	,h.message
	,h.SERVER
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobhistory h
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobs j ON h.job_id = j.job_id
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobsteps s ON j.job_id = s.job_id
	AND h.step_id = s.step_id
WHERE h.run_date > @FinalDate
ORDER BY h.instance_id DESC

 

To get a job history for everything that has succeeded or failed over the last 7 days run the query below. Simply change the @RunStatus variable to either 0 (failed) or 1 (succeeded).

-- Variable Declarations 
DECLARE @RunStatus AS BIT
DECLARE @PreviousDate DATETIME
DECLARE @Year VARCHAR(4)
DECLARE @Month VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @MonthPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @Day VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @DayPre VARCHAR(2)
DECLARE @FinalDate INT

/*Succeeded Jobs*/
--SET @RunStatus = 1
/*Failed Jobs*/
SET @RunStatus = 0

-- Initialize Variables 
SET @PreviousDate = DATEADD(dd, - 7, GETDATE()) -- Last 7 days  
SET @Year = DATEPART(yyyy, @PreviousDate)

SELECT @MonthPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(mm, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Month = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@MonthPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SELECT @DayPre = CONVERT(VARCHAR(2), DATEPART(dd, @PreviousDate))

SELECT @Day = RIGHT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, (@DayPre + 1000000000)), 2)

SET @FinalDate = CAST(@Year + @Month + @Day AS INT)

-- Pull Job History 
SELECT j.[name]
	,s.step_name
	,h.step_id
	,MSDB.DBO.AGENT_DATETIME(h.run_date, h.run_time) AS run_time
	,STUFF(STUFF(STUFF(RIGHT(REPLICATE('0', 8) + CAST(h.run_duration AS VARCHAR(8)), 8), 3, 0, ':'), 6, 0, ':'), 9, 0, ':') 'run_duration (DD:HH:MM:SS)  '
	,h.run_status
	,h.sql_severity
	,h.message
	,h.SERVER
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobhistory h
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobs j ON h.job_id = j.job_id
INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.sysjobsteps s ON j.job_id = s.job_id
	AND h.step_id = s.step_id
WHERE h.run_status = @RunStatus
	AND h.run_date > @FinalDate
ORDER BY h.instance_id DESC

 

If you want to generate a list of all the:

  1. jobs and their owners
  2. SSIS packages and their owners

you can do so by running the queries below. (If you don’t already know the precise name or ID of a job)

--Jobs
select s.name,l.name
 from  msdb..sysjobs s 
 left join master.sys.syslogins l on s.owner_sid = l.sid

--Packages
select s.name,l.name 
from msdb..sysssispackages s 
 left join master.sys.syslogins l on s.ownersid = l.sid

 

Once you have retrieved either the name (command) or the ID of the job you are looking for you can plug that info into either one of the queries below also.

use msdb

select *
from dbo.sysjobsteps with (nolock)
where command like '%YourJobName%'

select *
from dbo.sysjobs sj with (nolock)
where sj.job_id = '1234-1234-1234-1234-1234'
Image with the text 3000 years later in giant letters

How to provide a dynamic parameter drop down of year options in SSRS

Say you’ve developed a report which returns data based on a inputted year parameter value, e.g. “give me all the sales in 2014”.

How do you provide the year options for the SSRS report?

Well there’s three ways that come to mind.

Select distinct from a date field, e.g. SELECT DISTINCT YEAR(SalesDate) FROM Sales

This would certainly provide you with all the available years but the database could have millions of sales. So it’s not too efficient.

You could manually populate years in the parameter settings in the SSRS report, kind of primitive but it would work.

But for me the robust and efficient way is the solution provided below.

The following SQL query dynamically populates an integer field in a temporary table with years. The query uses a base year variable, which can be set to as far back as when the required data fields and values existed in the database. A loop then provides the years up to and including the current year. This query can be used to generate a dataset for an SSRS report and then this dataset can then be used to provide parameter values for the report. The report will then always create a list of years between the base year and the current year. Meaning the years parameter will never need to be adjusted again.

/*Create temp table populated with the years from a base year to the present year*/
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#availableYear') IS NOT NULL
    DROP TABLE #availableYear

CREATE TABLE #availableYear ([Year] INT)

DECLARE @baseYear AS INT
DECLARE @i AS INT

/*Change the base year to the earliest year the database has the required data available*/
SET @baseYear = 2013
SET @i = 0

WHILE @i <= YEAR(GETDATE()) - @baseYear
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO #availableYear
    SELECT @baseYear + @i

    SET @i = @i + 1
END

SELECT * FROM #availableYear

Within the Stored Procedure that populates the report you can then do something like below to make sure the date range matches the year chosen.

DECLARE @yearChosen AS INT

SET @yearChosen = 2013

DECLARE @startDate date
DECLARE @endDate date

SET @startDate = CONVERT(CHAR(4), @yearChosen) + '0101'
SET @endDate = CONVERT(CHAR(4), @yearChosen) + '1231'

PRINT @startDate
PRINT @endDate    

--OR For example

YEAR(SaleDate) = @yearChosen

How to determine what stored procedures relate to what tables

Foreign keys are usually a good indicator of which tables connect to each other however you may be working in an environment that does not always follow best practices. As well as that you may not know what store procedures relate to what tables.
Sometimes databases need to move from one server to another or are depreciated. Before this can happened it is a very good idea to do a compressive assessment to see what interacts with what.
As once a thing gets moved everything that queries against it needs to point to it its new location.
A good starting point of this assessment would be to use the query below to determine what stored procedures reference the table specified in the WHERE clause.

  • NOTES: This query only pulls the tabled referenced in the database, it does not pull tables that are referenced from other databases.
  • Although the table maybe reference it may not actually be interacted with by the query, the table name may be comment in the code for example. However for the most part it is more likely the table has some action performed against it, be it a SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE etc.

The query works by using the sysobjects and syscomments tables.
Sysobjects: a system table that contains a row for each user-defined, schema-scoped object that is created within a database, including natively compiled scalar user-defined function.

Syscomments: a system table that contains entries for each view, rule, default, trigger, CHECK constraint, DEFAULT constraint, and stored procedure within the database. The text column contains the original SQL definition statements.

Or to dumb it down it joins, in our case, the stored procedures name to the query and scans this query for references to the specified table.

/*
CHANGE THE FOLLOWING:
SERVER NAME: ServerName
DATABASE NAME: DatabaseName 
TABLE NAME: TableName
 */


USE DatabaseName;
GO

SELECT DISTINCT so.name
FROM syscomments sc
INNER JOIN sysobjects so ON sc.id=so.id
WHERE sc.TEXT LIKE '%TableName%'

To expand on this logic to return every table referenced in every stored procedure in a database run the code below:

/*
CHANGE THE FOLLOWING:
SERVER NAME: ServerName
DATABASE NAME: DatabaseName 
 */
 
USE DatabaseName;
GO 

--DROP TEMP TABLES
IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TablesAndSPs') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #TablesAndSPs

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Tables') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #Tables
	
--DECLARE VARIABLES
DECLARE @tableID AS INT
DECLARE @tableName AS VARCHAR(255)

--CREATE TEMP TABLE TO HOLD THE NAMES OF THE TABLES AND SPs
CREATE TABLE #TablesAndSPs (
	TABLE_ID INT
	,TABLE_NAME VARCHAR(255)
	,SP VARCHAR(255)
	)

--GET A LIST OF THE TABLES IN DATABASE
SELECT row_number() OVER (
		ORDER BY TABLE_NAME
		) AS TABLE_ID
	,TABLE_NAME
INTO #Tables
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES

SET @tableID = 1

--LOOP AND POPULATE #TablesAndSPs
WHILE @tableID <= (
		SELECT MAX(TABLE_ID)
		FROM #Tables
		)
BEGIN
	SET @tableName = (
			SELECT TABLE_NAME
			FROM #Tables
			WHERE TABLE_ID = @tableID
			)

	INSERT INTO #TablesAndSPs
	SELECT DISTINCT @tableID
		,@tableName
		,so.NAME
	FROM syscomments sc
	INNER JOIN sysobjects so ON sc.id = so.id
	WHERE sc.TEXT LIKE '%' + @tableName + '%'

	SET @tableID = @tableID + 1
END

SELECT * FROM #TablesAndSPs

Creating Clustered, Nonclustered Indexes on a Temp Table

One of the best features of temp tables is that an index can be applied to them.

To clarify temp tables start with #, exist within the tempdb and are accessible within child batches (nested triggers, procedure, exec calls) of the query.

The execution plan can also determine the relevant statistics regarding their operation and suggest means of optimisation and will often suggest applying an index to the table.
Below is a simple example of applying both clustered and nonclustered indexes to the temporary table #Apostle created from a CTE (Common Table Expression).

 

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Apostle') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #Apostle;

WITH CTE
AS (
	SELECT 1 AS ID
		,'Simon Peter' AS NAME
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 2
		,'James'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 3
		,'John'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 4
		,'Andrew'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 5
		,'Philip'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 6
		,'Thomas'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 7
		,'Bartholomew'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 8
		,'Matthew'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 9
		,'James'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 10
		,'Simon'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 11
		,'Thaddaeus'
	
	UNION
	
	SELECT 12
		,'Judas'
	)
SELECT *
INTO #Apostle
FROM CTE

-- CREATE INDEXES
CREATE CLUSTERED INDEX IDX_CLUSTERED_ID ON #Apostle (ID)

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IDX_NONCLUSTERED_ID ON #Apostle (ID)

 

Microsoft defines clustered and nonclustered indexes as the following:

Clustered

  • Clustered indexes sort and store the data rows in the table or view based on their key values. These are the columns included in the index definition. There can be only one clustered index per table, because the data rows themselves can be sorted in only one order.
  • The only time the data rows in a table are stored in sorted order is when the table contains a clustered index. When a table has a clustered index, the table is called a clustered table. If a table has no clustered index, its data rows are stored in an unordered structure called a heap.

Nonclustered

  • Nonclustered indexes have a structure separate from the data rows. A nonclustered index contains the nonclustered index key values and each key value entry has a pointer to the data row that contains the key value.
  • The pointer from an index row in a nonclustered index to a data row is called a row locator. The structure of the row locator depends on whether the data pages are stored in a heap or a clustered table. For a heap, a row locator is a pointer to the row. For a clustered table, the row locator is the clustered index key.
  • You can add nonkey columns to the leaf level of the nonclustered index to by-pass existing index key limits, 900 bytes and 16 key columns, and execute fully covered, indexed, queries.

Source

To learn more about indexes this is a good video on the topic.

How to write text to File in SQL Server Management Studio

The following is a tutorial on creating a stored procedure that will allow you to create a file in any directory and insert text into this newly created file.

In order for this to work you will need to authorise the running of system stored procedures with Object Linking and Embedding functionality (See OLE).

Authorisation is needed as the stored procedure we will create rely on the system SPs sp_OACreate and sp_OAMethod.

sp_OACreate: Creates an instance of an OLE object.

sp_OAMethod: Calls a method of an OLE object.

NOTE: By default, SQL Server blocks access to OLE Automation stored procedures by turning the components off as part of the security configuration for the server.

Run the script below to grant authorisation.

--AUTHORIZE SYSTEM STORED PROCEDURES
sp_configure 'show advanced options'
	,1;
GO

RECONFIGURE;
GO

sp_configure 'Ole Automation Procedures'
	,1;
GO

RECONFIGURE;
GO

--AUTHORIZED

 
Next we will create the stored procedure WriteToFile. Substitute the DatabaseName with the database you will be using.

--CREATE STORED PROCEDURE
/*
CHANGE:
DATABASE NAME: DatabaseName 
 */
USE "DatabaseName";
GO

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO

SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO

IF OBJECT_ID('[dbo].[WriteToFile]', 'P') IS NOT NULL
	DROP PROCEDURE [WriteToFile];
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[WriteToFile] @File VARCHAR(255)
	,@Text VARCHAR(MAX)
	WITH EXECUTE AS CALLER
AS
BEGIN
	DECLARE @OLE INT
	DECLARE @FileID INT

	EXECUTE sp_OACreate 'Scripting.FileSystemObject'
		,@OLE OUT

	EXECUTE sp_OAMethod @OLE
		,'OpenTextFile'
		,@FileID OUT
		,@File
		,8
		,1

	EXECUTE sp_OAMethod @FileID
		,'WriteLine'
		,NULL
		,@Text

	EXECUTE sp_OADestroy @FileID

	EXECUTE sp_OADestroy @OLE
END;

 
Below is an example using the WriteToFile stored procedure.

--WRITE TO FILE EXAMPLE
/*
CHANGE:
DATABASE NAME: DatabaseName 
 */
USE "DatabaseName";
GO

DECLARE @Path VARCHAR(255)
DECLARE @Txt VARCHAR(MAX)

--NOTE: THE LOG FILE WILL BE CREATED IF IT DOES NOT ALREADY EXIST
SET @PATH = 'C:\temp\WriteToFileExampleLog.txt'
SET @Txt = 'Hello World'

EXEC [DatabaseName].[dbo].[WriteToFile] @Path
	,@Txt;

 

Using the same stored procedure here’s an example writing a table to the file using concatenation and a loop. This process works by taking the table row by row and writing the concatenated value to the file. There are easier ways to achieve this however, i.e. utilising the export functionality built into SSMS and saving this as a package to be run as a job.

--STORED PROCEDURE CREATED
--WRITE TABLE TO FILE EXAMPLE
DECLARE @Path VARCHAR(255)
DECLARE @Txt VARCHAR(MAX)
DECLARE @loopId AS INT
DECLARE @maxId AS INT
DECLARE @TempCustomer TABLE (
	ID_column INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY
	,FirstName NVARCHAR(100)
	);

--NOTE: THE LOG FILE WILL BE CREATED IF IT DOES NOT ALREADY EXIST
SET @PATH = 'C:\temp\WriteToFileExampleLog.txt'

INSERT INTO @tempCustomer (FirstName)
VALUES ('Paul')
	,('Jim')
	,('John')

SET @loopId = 1
SET @maxId = (
		SELECT MAX(ID_column)
		FROM @TempCustomer
		)

WHILE @loopId <= @maxId
BEGIN
	SELECT @Txt = CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), ID_column) + ', ' + FirstName
	FROM @TempCustomer
	WHERE ID_column = @loopId

	PRINT @Txt

	EXEC [TEST_DB].[dbo].[WriteToFile] @Path
		,@Txt;

	SET @loopId = @loopId + 1
END

 

How to enable and disable xp_cmdshell

xp_cmdshell is an extended stored procedure provided by Microsoft and stored in the master database. This procedure allows you to issue operating system commands directly to the Windows command shell via T-SQL code.

By default, the xp_cmdshell option is disabled on new installations. Along with other unwanted behavior malicious users can elevate their privileges with the use of xp_cmdshell. For this reason it is generally recommend to leave xp_cmdshell disabled. It can be enabled by using the Policy-Based Management or by running the sp_configure system stored procedure as shown in the following code example:

Use Master
GO

EXEC master.dbo.sp_configure 'show advanced options', 1
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

EXEC master.dbo.sp_configure 'xp_cmdshell', 1
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

 

To disable xp_cmdshell use the following code example. Note: The following example also sets show advanced options server configuration option to 0. It is best practice to leave this option in the default state of 0 to stop the enabling of features.

Use Master
GO

EXEC master.dbo.sp_configure 'xp_cmdshell', 0
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

EXEC master.dbo.sp_configure 'show advanced options', 0
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO