Tag Archives: guide

How to solve the SQL Server error ‘String or binary data would be truncated’

The ‘String or binary data would be truncated’ error will occur if an insert or update statement is trying to put too many characters into a field, defined in a table, which has been assigned too few character spaces. For example trying to write an email address with 255 characters into a table where the column email has been assigned 40 characters.

The easy fix is assign more characters to the column or columns you have determined are experiencing the problem. The more complicated but potentially necessary fix might be to change the logic or introduce validation at the source of data entry.

Finding the columns experiencing the problems however can be time consuming.

( . . . without the little script below of course)

SQL Server will kindly direct you to the stored procedure or insert/update statement that is experiencing the problem. However it will not pin point the exact column or columns that cannot be written to. The pain then is determining where the data won’t fit.

To speed things up take the entire query or query section you know to be causing the problem and write the results it into a temp table called #temp, i.e. SELECT * INTO #temp FROM SomeTable

Once the data has been written to the temp table #temp run the scrip below in the same window.

DECLARE @sql VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @sql = (
		SELECT (
				SELECT ',MAX(LEN(' + NAME + ')) AS [' + NAME + ']'
				FROM tempdb.sys.columns
				WHERE object_id = object_id('tempdb..#temp')
				FOR XML PATH('')
				)
		)
SET @sql = 'SELECT ' + RIGHT(@sql, LEN(@sql) - 1) + ' FROM #temp'

EXEC (@sql)
This will output results giving you the max character length of each field.
You can then compare these results to the defined destination table that the data could not be written to.
The source of the error will be where the max character number is greater than the assigned character spaces on the destination table.
For example the last time I used this query it easily highlighted that an agent had written a customers full address to the county name field which had a limit of 30 characters.

 

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How to install Ubuntu server on a Dell thin client to host Kanboard

Well your first question might be “Why install Ubuntu server on a Dell thin client to host Kanboard?”. Good question, the answer is I wanted to trial kanboard and this was the only hardware resource made available to me by the IT infrastructure department, but hey it’s working. So if you’ve ever wondered can Ubuntu Server be installed on a thin client the answer is yes, but there won’t be enough space left to install a GUI so you might want to brush up on your terminal commands prior. And using a thin client isn’t as mad as it sounds because they’re designed to run 24/7 too unlike laptops or conventional desktops.

What is kanboard?

Kanboard is an opensource web hosted project management software. So far I think it’s pretty damn cool. It has all the features of the top paid project management solutions out there with the little added bonus of it being free.

But there’s no such thing as a free meal I hear you cry and you’re right.

The “cost” for me has been the setup time. If you’ve tried this before, or are working you’re way through it now, you likely encountered the same stumbling blocks I did so below are the solutions I used to get the installation up and running. Hopefully this will reduce the “cost” for you.

The hardware I’m using is a OptiPlex FX170 Thin Client. That comes with a measly atom processor, 2 Gb of ram and 4 Gb of flash memory. Shockingly though that’s enough to run 32 bit Ubuntu Server 16.04 but like I said you won’t have enough space left to install a GUI. I’m not going to walk through the installation process because it’s pretty standard. The only thing to remember is you’ll need to choose the LAMP option in the Software Selection screen. Tab to that option and hit space to select it and then hit return to continue on with the installation.

SoftwareSelection

To check if the LAMP installed correctly on the server you can jump onto another machine on the network and try log onto the server’s host IP via the web browser. To get the IP address to use type the below into the server’s linux terminal.

ifconfig -a

If LAMP is up and running on the server you should see the screen below from your web browser.

DefaultPage

Once you’ve confirmed you have LAMP installed successfully head over to the Kanboard site and follow the latest installation instructions for the OS on your server. The instructions I used are below:

Ubuntu Xenial 16.04 LTS

Install Apache and PHP:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install -y apache2 libapache2-mod-php7.0 php7.0-cli php7.0-mbstring php7.0-sqlite3 \
    php7.0-opcache php7.0-json php7.0-mysql php7.0-pgsql php7.0-ldap php7.0-gd

Install Kanboard:

cd /var/www/html
sudo wget https://kanboard.net/kanboard-latest.zip
sudo unzip kanboard-latest.zip
sudo chown -R www-data:www-data kanboard/data
sudo rm kanboard-latest.zip

Now downloading and installing using the script above just wouldn’t work for me. If it worked for you skip down to Internal Errors encountered.

I don’t know whether it was down to web access firewalls or the download link and file names not corresponding but I couldn’t get the script working. Instead I downloaded the latest kanboard zip file to a usb key using my laptop, unzipped it, and then mounted the key on the server. Without a GUI that was a pain. I was able to mount the file using the steps below:

Enter sudo mkdir /media/usb to create a mount point called usb.

Enter sudo fdisk -l to look for the USB drive already plugged in, let’s say the drive you want to mount is /dev/sdb1.

To mount a USB drive formatted with FAT16 or FAT32 system, enter:

sudo mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 /media/usb -o uid=1000,gid=100,utf8,dmask=027,fmask=137

OR, To mount a USB drive formatted with NTFS system, enter:

sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/usb

To unmount it, just enter sudo umount /media/usb in the Terminal.

Next I copied the files from the key across with the following command:

cp -r /media/usb/kanboard /var/www/html/kanboard

When the folder was across I could then run:

sudo chown -R www-data:www-data kanboard/data

So at that point it was up and running right, Yay!

Hah! Only joking!

After installing I ran into three errors the fixes for which are below.

Internal Errors encountered:

Internal Error: PHP extension required: “pdo_sqlite”

Solution: Run the following in the terminal window

sudo apt-get install php7.0-sqlite

Internal Error: PHP extension required: “gd”

Solution: Run the following in the terminal window

sudo apt-get install -y php7.0 php7.0-sqlite php7.0-gd unzip

Internal Error: PHP extension required: “mbstring”

Solution: Run the following in the terminal window

sudo apt-get install php7.0-mbstring

If you’ve read this article with an eagle eye you’ll have noticed that I ran two of those scripts at the start of the installation, for some reason they just needed to be run again for me, maybe that won’t be the case for you.

For the first interal error, PHP extension required: “pdo_sqlite” you may also need to run through the process below.

Review and edit the PHP Configuration

First we create a file which will display the PHP configuration.

To create a file first change into the directory that contains your website files. For example, the default directory for webpage files for Apache on Ubuntu is /var/www/html/.

Change Directory:

cd /var/www/html

Create File:

sudo nano /var/www/html/info.php

Enter the following text and then save it (Press Crtl+o to save the file)

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Find where the php.ini file is locationed:

Use you web browser to open the file you just created for example,

http://www.example.com/info.php

This will bring up a page like below.
You are looking for the “Loaded Configuration File” entry.

Loadedfile

Warning: Since the info.php file displays version details of the OS, Web Server, and PHP, this file should be removed when it is not needed to keep the server as secure as possible.

Modifying the PHP Configuration:

sudo nano /etc/php7.0/apache2/php.ini

You want to remove the leading semi-colons from the following line

;extension=php_pdo_sqlite.dll

Hint: Press Ctrl+w and enter the string “extension=php_pdo_sqlite.dll” to find the line in the file.

Press Crtl+o to save the file.

Restart Apache server:

sudo service apache2 restart

That’s it, if you’re as mad as me to run servers on thin clients so you can host Kanboard it should be up and running for you now.

Update:

If anyone is trying to get email working via smtp and a microsoft exchange server Kanboard has provided instructions for this.  LINK

I had to comment out the two bottom lines to make it work.

// Credentials for authentication on the SMTP server (not mandatory)
define('MAIL_SMTP_USERNAME', 'username');
define('MAIL_SMTP_PASSWORD', 'super password');

 

 

How to use a while loop to iterate through each table of each database within an instance

Say you have code you want executed against every table on a SQL Server instance, you could use SQL Server’s inbuilt sp_MSForEachDB and sp_MSForEachTable. I’m not a big fan of them though because they are undocumented, so I’d always be concerned Microsoft might decide to kill it with any given patch or service pack update. (I know the likelihood of that is extremely low but I’m a risk adverse kinda guy)

I prefer to use the example below. It may not be the most efficient snippet of code available on the net but it’s good and simple and it’s not going anywhere unless I drop it. 

SET NOCOUNT ON

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Table') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #Table;

DECLARE @Database TABLE (DbName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @DbName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @TableName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @SchemaName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)
DECLARE @s AS INT
DECLARE @f AS INT

CREATE TABLE #Table (
	Id INT IDENTITY(1, 1)
	,DbName SYSNAME
	,SchemaName SYSNAME
	,TableName SYSNAME
	);

SET @DbName = ''

INSERT INTO @Database (DbName)
SELECT NAME
FROM master.dbo.sysdatabases
WHERE NAME <> 'tempdb'
ORDER BY NAME ASC

WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @DbName = (
			SELECT MIN(DbName)
			FROM @Database
			WHERE DbName > @DbName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #Table (
	DbName
	,SchemaName
	,TableName
	)
SELECT ' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + '
	,s.NAME
	,so.NAME
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.tables AS so
LEFT JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.schemas AS s ON so.schema_id = s.schema_id
ORDER BY s.NAME ASC'

	EXEC (@Sql)
END

SET @s = (
		SELECT MIN(Id)
		FROM #Table
		)
SET @f = (
		SELECT MAX(Id)
		FROM #Table
		) + 1

WHILE @s < @f
BEGIN

	/*
	PUT CODE HERE
	EXAMPLE PRINT Id
	*/
	PRINT @s

	SET @s = @s + 1
END

How to assess T-SQL code quickly

I’m sure you’re an excellent SQL coder writing beautiful efficient queries, but your predecessor . . . well they might have just been lucky to have a job.

Going through someone else’s bad code is usually tiresome, tedious and often very confusing.

I’ve created the T-SQL Assessor excel file to help in this task.

DOWNLOAD (Dropbox link)

The assessor will colour code the sql to highlight the lines of importance. With the Key Word column you can then simply filter to words like INSERT, UPDATE, MERGE and EXEC to see where the data is going or filter the column by the word FROM to see where the data has come from.

To use the T-SQL Assessor file you will first have to format your code using Poor Man’s T-SQL Formatter. This excellent tool can be installed in Visual Studio, SQL Server Management Studio or Notepad++.

http://architectshack.com/PoorMansTSqlFormatter.ashx

You can also use the online option:

http://poorsql.com/

Poor Man’s T-SQL Formatter makes text that contains a SQL command a new line, so you can’t have INSERT and FROM on one line. This is what allows Excel formula’s to highlight the lines with key words as each line can only contain one key word, excluding comments.

Once the code is formatted simply paste it into the first sheet of the file, “SQL”.

That’s it, all the work is then done for you on the second sheet of the file, “SQL Assessed”

T-SQL Assessor is also great at preparing a report from a schema compare script created by Visual Studio. It’s very annoying Microsoft didn’t provide a way of exporting the comparison directly into excel the way Redgate did but this will help. Simply filter the file to only include the keywords.

DOWNLOAD (Dropbox link)

How to archive tables that contain a keyword from one database to another using T-Sql

In the previous article I wrote about how to identify and remove unwanted tables. Link

In that tutorial I suggested prefixing the tables you want to remove with _DELETE_.

I also suggested you may want to archive the tables in some manner before you delete them. This could be because there is a chance someone might come looking for the data that was in a deleted table or something might break by removing the table and you might want to put it back asap.

If you have only a few tables you could script the tables out but if you have a lot of tables that becomes a little unmanageable. Also if the tables total in size to 10 Gb the script to recreate the tables will be a lot lot larger.

An alternative method is to create an Archive database, copy the tables across to this target database and then delete the tables in the source database. You can then backup and drop the Archive database saving the .bak file somewhere cheaper.

The script below will allow you to do just that. It prints the T-Sql to do the job, it doesn’t carry out the job, so it’s completely safe to execute and review.

To use the script below create a target database.

Use the target database name for the variable value @TargetDb

Use the source database name for the variable value @SourceDb

The @KeyWord variable is used to gather all the tables that contain the string of choice, in the example below _DELETE_.

The @RemoveKeyWord variable is a flag that will remove the keyword string from the target database table name, e.g. _DELETE_Sales will become Sales.

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Table') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #Table
GO

DECLARE @RemoveKeyWord BIT
DECLARE @Id AS INT
DECLARE @KeyWord AS VARCHAR(256)
DECLARE @SourceDb AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @TargetDb AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @TableName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @SchemaName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @RemoveKeyWord = 1
SET @KeyWord = '_DELETE_'
SET @TargetDb = 'Archive'
SET @SourceDb = 'Source'
SET NOCOUNT ON

CREATE TABLE #Table (
	Id_Table INT IDENTITY(1, 1)
	,SchemaName SYSNAME
	,TableName SYSNAME
	);

SET @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #Table (
	SchemaName
	,TableName
	)
SELECT s.NAME
	,so.NAME
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.sys.tables AS so
LEFT JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.sys.schemas AS s ON so.schema_id = s.schema_id
WHERE so.NAME LIKE ' + '''' + '%' + @KeyWord + '%' + '''' + '
ORDER BY s.NAME ASC'

EXEC (@Sql)

SET @SchemaName = ''

WHILE @SchemaName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @SchemaName = (
			SELECT MIN(SchemaName)
			FROM #Table
			WHERE SchemaName > @SchemaName
				AND SchemaName <> 'dbo'
			)

	PRINT 'USE ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + ';
GO
	
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + '.sys.schemas WHERE name = ' + '''' + @SchemaName + '''' + ')
  BEGIN
    EXEC (' + '''' + 'CREATE SCHEMA ' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + ';' + '''' + ');
  END;
  
'
END

SET @Id = 1

WHILE @Id IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SELECT @TableName = TableName
		,@SchemaName = SchemaName
	FROM #Table
	WHERE Id_Table = @Id

	IF @RemoveKeyWord = 1
	BEGIN
		PRINT '
SELECT *
INTO ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(REPLACE(@TableName, @KeyWord, '')) + ' 
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@TableName)
	END
	ELSE
	BEGIN
		PRINT '
SELECT *
INTO ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@TableName) + ' 
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@TableName)
	END

	SET @Id = (
			SELECT MIN(Id_Table)
			FROM #Table
			WHERE Id_Table > @Id
			)
END

How to identify and remove unused tables in SQL Server with T-Sql

In a perfect world an organisation should never get itself into the situation where tables need to be identified as functionally obsolete and removed in bulk. Schema changes should be stepped through the cycle of development, test, staging and live with developers cleaning as they go, but we don’t live in a perfect world as you may have noticed.

What do I mean by functionally obsolete? This means the tables are no longer being interacted with by user generated objects like stored procedures, functions or views. There may also be tables that could be classified as business redundant. That is they are being referenced by user generated objects frequently but they no longer have a use to the business, i.e. one job may have been replaced by another without the former being disabled or dropped. Business redundant objects are more difficult to determine and finding them may require input from multiple stakeholders.

A good approach for removing objects is to rename the objects first. This makes it easier to put the environment back the way it was if there are any problems encountered. After a set period of time if there is no impact on the overall environment script out the object then drop it. (Obviously do this in a test environment first if possible)

The script below is mostly a light weight SELECT statement that can be run on any environment. It does not execute any of the code it generates. It uses the sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats dynamic management view to determine when the tables were last interacted with. Interaction being defined as the following actions being applied against the object, update, seek, scan, lookup.

Caveat: Entries in this view reset to NULL after a Server reboot. Also the DMV has been known to be a bit unreliable with earlier versions of SQL Server with cases of the view being reset when a full index rebuild is carried out against a table. So don’t execute any code without first reviewing it.

Tables with NULL values for the fields below should be tables that have not been referenced at all or at least since the last time the server was rebooted.

LastUserUpdate
LastUserSeek
LastUserScan
LastUserLookup

Removing these objects is the low hanging fruit of cleaning up an environment. The script also provides stats on how many times these interactions happened and the size of the object. All these stats together should help you determine if an object is functionally redundant or business redundant and can be removed.

To aid further in the cleanup the script also creates the fields Action, Comments, Renamed, RenamedDate, RenameForDeletion, RestoreOriginalName, DropTable, DroppedDate.

The script output can then be copied and pasted into an Excel spread sheet and used to coordinate and track the cleanup progress.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Database TABLE ([DbName] [sysname])
DECLARE @DbName AS [sysname]
DECLARE @Sql AS [varchar] (max)

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TableStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #TableStats

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#IndexStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #IndexStats

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TableUsageStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #TableUsageStats

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TableSizeStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #TableSizeStats

CREATE TABLE #TableStats (
	[DbName] [sysname]
	,[SchemaName] [sysname]
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[TableName] [sysname]
	,[ModifiedDate] [datetime]
	);

CREATE TABLE #IndexStats (
	[DbName] [sysname]
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[HasIndex] [bit]
	);

CREATE TABLE #TableSizeStats (
	[DbName] [varchar](255) NULL
	,[SchemaName] [varchar](255) NULL
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[TableName] [varchar](255) NULL
	,[RowCount] [bigint] NULL
	,[AvailableSpacePercentage] [numeric](6, 2) NULL
	,[UnusedSpaceGb] [numeric](10, 3) NULL
	,[UsedSpaceGb] [numeric](10, 3) NULL
	,[TotalSpaceGb] [numeric](10, 3) NULL
	,[UnusedSpaceMb] [numeric](13, 3) NULL
	,[UsedSpaceMb] [numeric](13, 3) NULL
	,[TotalSpaceMb] [numeric](13, 3) NULL
	,[UnusedSpaceKb] [bigint] NULL
	,[UsedSpaceKb] [bigint] NULL
	,[TotalSpaceKb] [bigint] NULL
	)

CREATE TABLE #TableUsageStats (
	[DbName] [sysname]
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[TableName] [nvarchar](128) NULL
	,[LastUserUpdate] [datetime] NULL
	,[LastUserSeek] [datetime] NULL
	,[LastUserScan] [datetime] NULL
	,[LastUserLookup] [datetime] NULL
	,[UserUpdateCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	,[UserSeekCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	,[UserScanCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	,[UserLookupCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	);

SET @DbName = '';

INSERT INTO @Database (DbName)
SELECT NAME
FROM master.dbo.sysdatabases
WHERE NAME NOT IN (
		'tempdb'
		,'master'
		,'mode'
		,'model'
		)
ORDER BY NAME ASC;

WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @DbName = (
			SELECT MIN(DbName)
			FROM @Database
			WHERE DbName > @DbName
			);
	SET @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #TableStats (
	DbName
	,schemaName
	,ObjectId
	,TableName
	,ModifiedDate
	)
SELECT DbName
	,SchemaName
	,ObjectId
	,TableName
	,ModifiedDate
FROM (
SELECT DISTINCT ' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
	,s.NAME AS SchemaName
	,t.object_id AS ObjectId
	,t.NAME AS TableName
	,t.modify_date AS ModifiedDate
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.tables AS t
INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.schemas AS s ON t.schema_id = s.schema_id
LEFT JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.extended_properties AS ep ON ep.major_id = t.[object_id] /*Exclude System Tables*/
WHERE t.NAME IS NOT NULL
	AND s.NAME IS NOT NULL
	AND (ep.[name] IS NULL OR ep.[name] <> ''microsoft_database_tools_support'')
	) AS rd
WHERE rd.SchemaName IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY DbName ASC
	,TableName ASC;
'

	EXEC (@Sql)

	SELECT @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #IndexStats (
	DbName
	,ObjectId
	,HasIndex
	)
SELECT ' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
	,OBJECT_ID AS ObjectId
	,IndexCheck AS HasIndex
FROM (
	SELECT DISTINCT OBJECT_ID
		,CASE 
			WHEN (
					[TYPE] > 0
					AND is_disabled = 0
					)
				THEN 1
			ELSE 0
			END AS IndexCheck
	FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.indexes
	) AS rd
WHERE rd.IndexCheck = 1
'

	EXEC (@Sql)

	SET @Sql = 
		'
INSERT INTO #TableSizeStats (
	[DbName]
	,[SchemaName]
	,[ObjectId]
	,[TableName]
	,[RowCount]
	,[AvailableSpacePercentage]
	,[UnusedSpaceGb]
	,[UsedSpaceGb]
	,[TotalSpaceGb]
	,[UnusedSpaceMb]
	,[UsedSpaceMb]
	,[TotalSpaceMb]
	,[UnusedSpaceKb]
	,[UsedSpaceKb]
	,[TotalSpaceKb]
	)
SELECT DISTINCT rd.[DbName]
	,rd.[SchemaName]
	,rd.[ObjectId]
	,rd.[TableName]
	,rd.[RowCount]
	,CASE 
		WHEN TotalSpaceKb > 0
			THEN ((UnusedSpaceKb / TotalSpaceKb) * 100)
		ELSE 0
		END AS AvailableSpacePercentage
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 3), (rd.[UnusedSpaceKb] / 1024.) / 1024.) AS UnusedSpaceGb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 3), (rd.[UsedSpaceKb] / 1024.) / 1024.) AS UsedSpaceGb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 3), (rd.[TotalSpaceKb] / 1024.) / 1024.) AS TotalSpaceGb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(13, 3), (rd.[UnusedSpaceKb] / 1024.)) AS UnusedSpaceMb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(13, 3), (rd.[UsedSpaceKb] / 1024.)) AS UsedSpaceMb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(13, 3), (rd.[TotalSpaceKb] / 1024.)) AS TotalSpaceMb
	,rd.[UnusedSpaceKb]
	,rd.[UsedSpaceKb]
	,rd.[TotalSpaceKb]
FROM (
	SELECT ' 
		+ '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
		,t.Object_id AS ObjectId
		,s.[name] AS [SchemaName]
		,t.[name] AS [TableName]
		,p.[rows] AS [RowCount]
		,SUM(a.[used_pages]) * 8 AS [UsedSpaceKb]
		,(SUM(a.[total_pages]) - SUM(a.[used_pages])) * 8 AS [UnusedSpaceKb]
		,SUM(a.[total_pages]) * 8 AS [TotalSpaceKb]
	FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.tables AS t
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.schemas AS s ON t.schema_id = s.schema_id
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.indexes AS i ON t.OBJECT_ID = i.object_id
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.partitions AS p ON i.object_id = p.OBJECT_ID
		AND i.[index_id] = p.[index_id]
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.allocation_units a ON p.[partition_id] = a.[container_id]
	WHERE t.[is_ms_shipped] = 0
		AND i.OBJECT_ID > 255
	GROUP BY s.[name]
		,t.[name]
		,t.[object_id]
		,p.[rows]
	) AS rd
ORDER BY DbName ASC
	,SchemaName ASC
	,TableName ASC;
'

	EXEC (@Sql)

	SET @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #TableUsageStats (
	[DbName]
	,[ObjectId]
	,[TableName]
	,[LastUserUpdate]
	,[LastUserSeek]
	,[LastUserScan]
	,[LastUserLookup]
	,[UserUpdateCount]
	,[UserSeekCount]
	,[UserScanCount]
	,[UserLookupCount]
	)
SELECT DbName
	,ObjectId
	,TableName
	,LastUserUpdate
	,LastUserSeek
	,LastUserScan
	,LastUserLookup
	,UserUpdateCount
	,UserSeekCount
	,UserScanCount
	,UserLookupCount
FROM (
	SELECT DISTINCT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
			PARTITION BY ius.Object_Id ORDER BY last_user_update DESC
			) AS RN
		,' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
		,ius.OBJECT_ID AS ObjectId
		,o.NAME AS TableName
		,ius.last_user_update AS LastUserUpdate
		,ius.last_user_seek AS LastUserSeek
		,ius.last_user_scan AS LastUserScan
		,ius.last_user_lookup AS LastUserLookup
		,ius.user_updates AS UserUpdateCount
		,ius.user_seeks AS UserSeekCount
		,ius.user_scans AS UserScanCount
		,ius.user_lookups AS UserLookupCount
	FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + 
		'.sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS ius
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.objects AS o ON ius.OBJECT_ID = o.OBJECT_ID
		AND o.NAME IS NOT NULL
	) AS rd
WHERE rd.RN = 1
ORDER BY rd.DbName ASC
	,rd.TableName ASC
	,rd.LastUserUpdate DESC
	,rd.LastUserSeek DESC
	,rd.LastUserScan DESC
	,rd.LastUserLookup DESC;
'

	EXEC (@Sql)
END;
GO

SELECT DISTINCT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
		ORDER BY ts.[DbName] ASC
			,ts.[SchemaName] ASC
			,ts.[TableName] ASC
		) AS Row
	,ts.[DbName]
	,ts.[SchemaName]
	,ts.[TableName]
	,'' AS Action --Rename, keep etc.
	,'' AS Comments
	,'' AS Renamed --boolean flag
	,'' AS RenamedDate 
	,i.[HasIndex] --Tables without an index are heaps
	,tss.[TotalSpaceMb] AS TableSizeInMb
	,ts.[ModifiedDate]
	,tus.[LastUserUpdate]
	,tus.[LastUserSeek]
	,tus.[LastUserScan]
	,tus.[LastUserLookup]
	,tus.[UserUpdateCount]
	,tus.[UserSeekCount]
	,tus.[UserScanCount]
	,tus.[UserLookupCount]
	,tss.[AvailableSpacePercentage]
	,tss.[UnusedSpaceGb]
	,tss.[UsedSpaceGb]
	,tss.[TotalSpaceGb]
	,tss.[UnusedSpaceMb]
	,tss.[UsedSpaceMb]
	,tss.[TotalSpaceMb]
	,tss.[UnusedSpaceKb]
	,tss.[UsedSpaceKb]
	,tss.[TotalSpaceKb]
	,'USE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[DbName]) + '; EXEC sp_rename ' + '''' + ts.[SchemaName] + '.' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ', ' + '''' + '_DELETE_' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ';' AS RenameForDeletion
	,'USE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[DbName]) + '; EXEC sp_rename ' + '''' + ts.[SchemaName] + '.' + '_DELETE_' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ', ' + '''' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ';' AS RestoreOriginalName
	,'USE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[DbName]) + '; DROP TABLE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[SchemaName]) + '.' + '[' + '_DELETE_' + ts.[TableName] + ']' + ';' AS 'DropTable'
	,'' AS DroppedDate
FROM #TableStats AS ts
LEFT JOIN #TableSizeStats AS tss ON ts.ObjectId = tss.ObjectId
	AND tss.DbName = ts.DbName
LEFT JOIN #IndexStats AS i ON ts.ObjectId = i.ObjectId
	AND i.DbName = ts.DbName
LEFT JOIN #TableUsageStats AS tus ON ts.ObjectId = tus.ObjectId
	AND tus.DbName = ts.DbName
ORDER BY ts.[DbName] ASC
	,ts.[SchemaName] ASC
	,ts.[TableName] ASC

	-- REF: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/system-dynamic-management-views/sys-dm-db-index-usage-stats-transact-sql

How to disable all enabled user job schedules in SQL Server with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to test on a development environment.

Running the below script will output the T-Sql required to disable all enabled job schedules on the SQL Server instance. Just copy the outputted text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute to disable the jobs.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Schedule TABLE (ScheduleId INT)
DECLARE @ScheduleId AS INT
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @ScheduleId = ''

INSERT INTO @Schedule (ScheduleId)
SELECT s.schedule_id
FROM msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s
WHERE s.[enabled] = 1
	AND s.owner_sid <> 0x01
ORDER BY s.NAME ASC

WHILE @ScheduleId IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @ScheduleId = (
			SELECT MIN(ScheduleId)
			FROM @Schedule
			WHERE ScheduleId > @ScheduleId
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_update_schedule @schedule_id = ' + '''' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), @ScheduleId) + '''' + '
	,@enabled = 0; 
'

	PRINT @Sql
END

How to disable all enabled jobs in SQL Server with T-Sql where the job name contains specific keyword text

Running the below script will output the T-Sql required to disable all enabled jobs on the SQL Server instance where the job name contains a specific keyword. Just copy the outputted text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute to disable the jobs.

For example, if you change the text value ‘PLACEHOLDER’, for the variable @KeyWord, to ‘Backup’ then any job which has ‘Backup’ in its name will have T-Sql generated to disable it. You could change the PRINT to EXEC but I wouldn’t recommend it.

DECLARE @KeyWord AS VARCHAR(256)

SET @KeyWord = 'PLACEHOLDER'
SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Job TABLE (JobName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @JobName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @JobName = ''

INSERT INTO @Job (JobName)
SELECT j.NAME
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS j
WHERE j.[enabled] = 1
	AND j.NAME LIKE '%' + @KeyWord + '%' 
ORDER BY j.NAME ASC

WHILE @JobName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @JobName = (
			SELECT MIN(JobName)
			FROM @Job
			WHERE JobName > @JobName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_update_job @job_name = ' + '''' + @JobName + '''' + '
	,@enabled = 0; 
'

	PRINT @Sql
END

How to run all enabled SQL Server Jobs with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to test changes on a development environment.

Running the script will output the T-Sql required to run all jobs on the SQL Server instance. Just copy the text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute. You could change the PRINT to EXEC but I wouldn’t recommend it.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Job TABLE (JobName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @JobName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @JobName = ''

INSERT INTO @Job (JobName)
SELECT j.NAME
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS j
WHERE j.[enabled] = 1
ORDER BY j.NAME ASC

WHILE @JobName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @JobName = (
			SELECT MIN(JobName)
			FROM @Job
			WHERE JobName > @JobName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_start_job @job_name = ' + '''' + @JobName + '''' + '; 
'
	PRINT @Sql
END

How to delete all SQL Server Jobs that have no maintenance plan with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to clear out a development environment.

Running the script will output the T-Sql required to deleted all jobs on the SQL Server instance. Jobs for maintenance plans are not included as maintenance plans need to be deleted first. Just copy the text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute. You could change the PRINT to EXEC but I wouldn’t recommend it. 

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Job TABLE (JobName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @JobName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @JobName = ''

INSERT INTO @Job (JobName)
SELECT j.Name
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS j
LEFT JOIN msdb.dbo.sysmaintplan_subplans AS p ON j.job_id = p.job_id
WHERE p.subplan_id IS NULL
ORDER BY j.Name ASC

WHILE @JobName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @JobName = (
			SELECT MIN(JobName)
			FROM @Job
			WHERE JobName > @JobName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_delete_job @job_name = ' + '''' + @JobName + '''' + '; 
'
	PRINT @Sql
END