Category Archives: How To

How to archive tables that contain a keyword from one database to another using T-Sql

In the previous article I wrote about how to identify and remove unwanted tables. Link

In that tutorial I suggested prefixing the tables you want to remove with _DELETE_.

I also suggested you may want to archive the tables in some manner before you delete them. This could be because there is a chance someone might come looking for the data that was in a deleted table or something might break by removing the table and you might want to put it back asap.

If you have only a few tables you could script the tables out but if you have a lot of tables that becomes a little unmanageable. Also if the tables total in size to 10 Gb the script to recreate the tables will be a lot lot larger.

An alternative method is to create an Archive database, copy the tables across to this target database and then delete the tables in the source database. You can then backup and drop the Archive database saving the .bak file somewhere cheaper.

The script below will allow you to do just that. It prints the T-Sql to do the job, it doesn’t carry out the job, so it’s completely safe to execute and review.

To use the script below create a target database.

Use the target database name for the variable value @TargetDb

Use the source database name for the variable value @SourceDb

The @KeyWord variable is used to gather all the tables that contain the string of choice, in the example below _DELETE_.

The @RemoveKeyWord variable is a flag that will remove the keyword string from the target database table name, e.g. _DELETE_Sales will become Sales.

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#Table') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #Table
GO

DECLARE @RemoveKeyWord BIT
DECLARE @Id AS INT
DECLARE @KeyWord AS VARCHAR(256)
DECLARE @SourceDb AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @TargetDb AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @TableName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @SchemaName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @RemoveKeyWord = 1
SET @KeyWord = '_DELETE_'
SET @TargetDb = 'Archive'
SET @SourceDb = 'Source'
SET NOCOUNT ON

CREATE TABLE #Table (
	Id_Table INT IDENTITY(1, 1)
	,SchemaName SYSNAME
	,TableName SYSNAME
	);

SET @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #Table (
	SchemaName
	,TableName
	)
SELECT s.NAME
	,so.NAME
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.sys.tables AS so
LEFT JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.sys.schemas AS s ON so.schema_id = s.schema_id
WHERE so.NAME LIKE ' + '''' + '%' + @KeyWord + '%' + '''' + '
ORDER BY s.NAME ASC'

EXEC (@Sql)

SET @SchemaName = ''

WHILE @SchemaName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @SchemaName = (
			SELECT MIN(SchemaName)
			FROM #Table
			WHERE SchemaName > @SchemaName
				AND SchemaName <> 'dbo'
			)

	PRINT 'USE ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + ';
GO
	
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + '.sys.schemas WHERE name = ' + '''' + @SchemaName + '''' + ')
  BEGIN
    EXEC (' + '''' + 'CREATE SCHEMA ' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + ';' + '''' + ');
  END;
  
'
END

SET @Id = 1

WHILE @Id IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SELECT @TableName = TableName
		,@SchemaName = SchemaName
	FROM #Table
	WHERE Id_Table = @Id

	IF @RemoveKeyWord = 1
	BEGIN
		PRINT '
SELECT *
INTO ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(REPLACE(@TableName, @KeyWord, '')) + ' 
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@TableName)
	END
	ELSE
	BEGIN
		PRINT '
SELECT *
INTO ' + QUOTENAME(@TargetDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@TableName) + ' 
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@SourceDb) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@SchemaName) + '.' + QUOTENAME(@TableName)
	END

	SET @Id = (
			SELECT MIN(Id_Table)
			FROM #Table
			WHERE Id_Table > @Id
			)
END

How to identify and remove unused tables in SQL Server with T-Sql

In a perfect world an organisation should never get itself into the situation where tables need to be identified as functionally obsolete and removed in bulk. Schema changes should be stepped through the cycle of development, test, staging and live with developers cleaning as they go, but we don’t live in a perfect world as you may have noticed.

What do I mean by functionally obsolete? This means the tables are no longer being interacted with by user generated objects like stored procedures, functions or views. There may also be tables that could be classified as business redundant. That is they are being referenced by user generated objects frequently but they no longer have a use to the business, i.e. one job may have been replaced by another without the former being disabled or dropped. Business redundant objects are more difficult to determine and finding them may require input from multiple stakeholders.

A good approach for removing objects is to rename the objects first. This makes it easier to put the environment back the way it was if there are any problems encountered. After a set period of time if there is no impact on the overall environment script out the object then drop it. (Obviously do this in a test environment first if possible)

The script below is mostly a light weight SELECT statement that can be run on any environment. It does not execute any of the code it generates. It uses the sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats dynamic management view to determine when the tables were last interacted with. Interaction being defined as the following actions being applied against the object, update, seek, scan, lookup.

Caveat: Entries in this view reset to NULL after a Server reboot. Also the DMV has been known to be a bit unreliable with earlier versions of SQL Server with cases of the view being reset when a full index rebuild is carried out against a table. So don’t execute any code without first reviewing it.

Tables with NULL values for the fields below should be tables that have not been referenced at all or at least since the last time the server was rebooted.

LastUserUpdate
LastUserSeek
LastUserScan
LastUserLookup

Removing these objects is the low hanging fruit of cleaning up an environment. The script also provides stats on how many times these interactions happened and the size of the object. All these stats together should help you determine if an object is functionally redundant or business redundant and can be removed.

To aid further in the cleanup the script also creates the fields Action, Comments, Renamed, RenamedDate, RenameForDeletion, RestoreOriginalName, DropTable, DroppedDate.

The script output can then be copied and pasted into an Excel spread sheet and used to coordinate and track the cleanup progress.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Database TABLE ([DbName] [sysname])
DECLARE @DbName AS [sysname]
DECLARE @Sql AS [varchar] (max)

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TableStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #TableStats

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#IndexStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #IndexStats

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TableUsageStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #TableUsageStats

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#TableSizeStats', 'U') IS NOT NULL
	DROP TABLE #TableSizeStats

CREATE TABLE #TableStats (
	[DbName] [sysname]
	,[SchemaName] [sysname]
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[TableName] [sysname]
	,[ModifiedDate] [datetime]
	);

CREATE TABLE #IndexStats (
	[DbName] [sysname]
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[HasIndex] [bit]
	);

CREATE TABLE #TableSizeStats (
	[DbName] [varchar](255) NULL
	,[SchemaName] [varchar](255) NULL
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[TableName] [varchar](255) NULL
	,[RowCount] [bigint] NULL
	,[AvailableSpacePercentage] [numeric](6, 2) NULL
	,[UnusedSpaceGb] [numeric](10, 3) NULL
	,[UsedSpaceGb] [numeric](10, 3) NULL
	,[TotalSpaceGb] [numeric](10, 3) NULL
	,[UnusedSpaceMb] [numeric](13, 3) NULL
	,[UsedSpaceMb] [numeric](13, 3) NULL
	,[TotalSpaceMb] [numeric](13, 3) NULL
	,[UnusedSpaceKb] [bigint] NULL
	,[UsedSpaceKb] [bigint] NULL
	,[TotalSpaceKb] [bigint] NULL
	)

CREATE TABLE #TableUsageStats (
	[DbName] [sysname]
	,[ObjectId] [bigint]
	,[TableName] [nvarchar](128) NULL
	,[LastUserUpdate] [datetime] NULL
	,[LastUserSeek] [datetime] NULL
	,[LastUserScan] [datetime] NULL
	,[LastUserLookup] [datetime] NULL
	,[UserUpdateCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	,[UserSeekCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	,[UserScanCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	,[UserLookupCount] [bigint] NOT NULL
	);

SET @DbName = '';

INSERT INTO @Database (DbName)
SELECT NAME
FROM master.dbo.sysdatabases
WHERE NAME NOT IN (
		'tempdb'
		,'master'
		,'mode'
		,'model'
		)
ORDER BY NAME ASC;

WHILE @DbName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @DbName = (
			SELECT MIN(DbName)
			FROM @Database
			WHERE DbName > @DbName
			);
	SET @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #TableStats (
	DbName
	,schemaName
	,ObjectId
	,TableName
	,ModifiedDate
	)
SELECT DbName
	,SchemaName
	,ObjectId
	,TableName
	,ModifiedDate
FROM (
SELECT DISTINCT ' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
	,s.NAME AS SchemaName
	,t.object_id AS ObjectId
	,t.NAME AS TableName
	,t.modify_date AS ModifiedDate
FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.tables AS t
INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.schemas AS s ON t.schema_id = s.schema_id
LEFT JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.extended_properties AS ep ON ep.major_id = t.[object_id] /*Exclude System Tables*/
WHERE t.NAME IS NOT NULL
	AND s.NAME IS NOT NULL
	AND (ep.[name] IS NULL OR ep.[name] <> ''microsoft_database_tools_support'')
	) AS rd
WHERE rd.SchemaName IS NOT NULL
ORDER BY DbName ASC
	,TableName ASC;
'

	EXEC (@Sql)

	SELECT @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #IndexStats (
	DbName
	,ObjectId
	,HasIndex
	)
SELECT ' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
	,OBJECT_ID AS ObjectId
	,IndexCheck AS HasIndex
FROM (
	SELECT DISTINCT OBJECT_ID
		,CASE 
			WHEN (
					[TYPE] > 0
					AND is_disabled = 0
					)
				THEN 1
			ELSE 0
			END AS IndexCheck
	FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.indexes
	) AS rd
WHERE rd.IndexCheck = 1
'

	EXEC (@Sql)

	SET @Sql = 
		'
INSERT INTO #TableSizeStats (
	[DbName]
	,[SchemaName]
	,[ObjectId]
	,[TableName]
	,[RowCount]
	,[AvailableSpacePercentage]
	,[UnusedSpaceGb]
	,[UsedSpaceGb]
	,[TotalSpaceGb]
	,[UnusedSpaceMb]
	,[UsedSpaceMb]
	,[TotalSpaceMb]
	,[UnusedSpaceKb]
	,[UsedSpaceKb]
	,[TotalSpaceKb]
	)
SELECT DISTINCT rd.[DbName]
	,rd.[SchemaName]
	,rd.[ObjectId]
	,rd.[TableName]
	,rd.[RowCount]
	,CASE 
		WHEN TotalSpaceKb > 0
			THEN ((UnusedSpaceKb / TotalSpaceKb) * 100)
		ELSE 0
		END AS AvailableSpacePercentage
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 3), (rd.[UnusedSpaceKb] / 1024.) / 1024.) AS UnusedSpaceGb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 3), (rd.[UsedSpaceKb] / 1024.) / 1024.) AS UsedSpaceGb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(10, 3), (rd.[TotalSpaceKb] / 1024.) / 1024.) AS TotalSpaceGb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(13, 3), (rd.[UnusedSpaceKb] / 1024.)) AS UnusedSpaceMb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(13, 3), (rd.[UsedSpaceKb] / 1024.)) AS UsedSpaceMb
	,CONVERT(NUMERIC(13, 3), (rd.[TotalSpaceKb] / 1024.)) AS TotalSpaceMb
	,rd.[UnusedSpaceKb]
	,rd.[UsedSpaceKb]
	,rd.[TotalSpaceKb]
FROM (
	SELECT ' 
		+ '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
		,t.Object_id AS ObjectId
		,s.[name] AS [SchemaName]
		,t.[name] AS [TableName]
		,p.[rows] AS [RowCount]
		,SUM(a.[used_pages]) * 8 AS [UsedSpaceKb]
		,(SUM(a.[total_pages]) - SUM(a.[used_pages])) * 8 AS [UnusedSpaceKb]
		,SUM(a.[total_pages]) * 8 AS [TotalSpaceKb]
	FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.tables AS t
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.schemas AS s ON t.schema_id = s.schema_id
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.indexes AS i ON t.OBJECT_ID = i.object_id
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.partitions AS p ON i.object_id = p.OBJECT_ID
		AND i.[index_id] = p.[index_id]
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.allocation_units a ON p.[partition_id] = a.[container_id]
	WHERE t.[is_ms_shipped] = 0
		AND i.OBJECT_ID > 255
	GROUP BY s.[name]
		,t.[name]
		,t.[object_id]
		,p.[rows]
	) AS rd
ORDER BY DbName ASC
	,SchemaName ASC
	,TableName ASC;
'

	EXEC (@Sql)

	SET @Sql = '
INSERT INTO #TableUsageStats (
	[DbName]
	,[ObjectId]
	,[TableName]
	,[LastUserUpdate]
	,[LastUserSeek]
	,[LastUserScan]
	,[LastUserLookup]
	,[UserUpdateCount]
	,[UserSeekCount]
	,[UserScanCount]
	,[UserLookupCount]
	)
SELECT DbName
	,ObjectId
	,TableName
	,LastUserUpdate
	,LastUserSeek
	,LastUserScan
	,LastUserLookup
	,UserUpdateCount
	,UserSeekCount
	,UserScanCount
	,UserLookupCount
FROM (
	SELECT DISTINCT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
			PARTITION BY ius.Object_Id ORDER BY last_user_update DESC
			) AS RN
		,' + '''' + @DbName + '''' + ' AS DbName
		,ius.OBJECT_ID AS ObjectId
		,o.NAME AS TableName
		,ius.last_user_update AS LastUserUpdate
		,ius.last_user_seek AS LastUserSeek
		,ius.last_user_scan AS LastUserScan
		,ius.last_user_lookup AS LastUserLookup
		,ius.user_updates AS UserUpdateCount
		,ius.user_seeks AS UserSeekCount
		,ius.user_scans AS UserScanCount
		,ius.user_lookups AS UserLookupCount
	FROM ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + 
		'.sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats AS ius
	INNER JOIN ' + QUOTENAME(@DbName) + '.sys.objects AS o ON ius.OBJECT_ID = o.OBJECT_ID
		AND o.NAME IS NOT NULL
	) AS rd
WHERE rd.RN = 1
ORDER BY rd.DbName ASC
	,rd.TableName ASC
	,rd.LastUserUpdate DESC
	,rd.LastUserSeek DESC
	,rd.LastUserScan DESC
	,rd.LastUserLookup DESC;
'

	EXEC (@Sql)
END;
GO

SELECT DISTINCT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
		ORDER BY ts.[DbName] ASC
			,ts.[SchemaName] ASC
			,ts.[TableName] ASC
		) AS Row
	,ts.[DbName]
	,ts.[SchemaName]
	,ts.[TableName]
	,'' AS Action --Rename, keep etc.
	,'' AS Comments
	,'' AS Renamed --boolean flag
	,'' AS RenamedDate 
	,i.[HasIndex] --Tables without an index are heaps
	,tss.[TotalSpaceMb] AS TableSizeInMb
	,ts.[ModifiedDate]
	,tus.[LastUserUpdate]
	,tus.[LastUserSeek]
	,tus.[LastUserScan]
	,tus.[LastUserLookup]
	,tus.[UserUpdateCount]
	,tus.[UserSeekCount]
	,tus.[UserScanCount]
	,tus.[UserLookupCount]
	,tss.[AvailableSpacePercentage]
	,tss.[UnusedSpaceGb]
	,tss.[UsedSpaceGb]
	,tss.[TotalSpaceGb]
	,tss.[UnusedSpaceMb]
	,tss.[UsedSpaceMb]
	,tss.[TotalSpaceMb]
	,tss.[UnusedSpaceKb]
	,tss.[UsedSpaceKb]
	,tss.[TotalSpaceKb]
	,'USE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[DbName]) + '; EXEC sp_rename ' + '''' + ts.[SchemaName] + '.' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ', ' + '''' + '_DELETE_' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ';' AS RenameForDeletion
	,'USE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[DbName]) + '; EXEC sp_rename ' + '''' + ts.[SchemaName] + '.' + '_DELETE_' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ', ' + '''' + ts.[TableName] + '''' + ';' AS RestoreOriginalName
	,'USE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[DbName]) + '; DROP TABLE ' + QUOTENAME(ts.[SchemaName]) + '.' + '[' + '_DELETE_' + ts.[TableName] + ']' + ';' AS 'DropTable'
	,'' AS DroppedDate
FROM #TableStats AS ts
LEFT JOIN #TableSizeStats AS tss ON ts.ObjectId = tss.ObjectId
	AND tss.DbName = ts.DbName
LEFT JOIN #IndexStats AS i ON ts.ObjectId = i.ObjectId
	AND i.DbName = ts.DbName
LEFT JOIN #TableUsageStats AS tus ON ts.ObjectId = tus.ObjectId
	AND tus.DbName = ts.DbName
ORDER BY ts.[DbName] ASC
	,ts.[SchemaName] ASC
	,ts.[TableName] ASC

	-- REF: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/system-dynamic-management-views/sys-dm-db-index-usage-stats-transact-sql

How to disable all enabled user job schedules in SQL Server with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to test on a development environment.

Running the below script will output the T-Sql required to disable all enabled job schedules on the SQL Server instance. Just copy the outputted text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute to disable the jobs.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Schedule TABLE (ScheduleId INT)
DECLARE @ScheduleId AS INT
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @ScheduleId = ''

INSERT INTO @Schedule (ScheduleId)
SELECT s.schedule_id
FROM msdb.dbo.sysschedules AS s
WHERE s.[enabled] = 1
	AND s.owner_sid <> 0x01
ORDER BY s.NAME ASC

WHILE @ScheduleId IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @ScheduleId = (
			SELECT MIN(ScheduleId)
			FROM @Schedule
			WHERE ScheduleId > @ScheduleId
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_update_schedule @schedule_id = ' + '''' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(5), @ScheduleId) + '''' + '
	,@enabled = 0; 
'

	PRINT @Sql
END

How to disable all enabled jobs in SQL Server with T-Sql where the job name contains specific keyword text

Running the below script will output the T-Sql required to disable all enabled jobs on the SQL Server instance where the job name contains a specific keyword. Just copy the outputted text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute to disable the jobs.

For example, if you change the text value ‘PLACEHOLDER’, for the variable @KeyWord, to ‘Backup’ then any job which has ‘Backup’ in its name will have T-Sql generated to disable it. You could change the PRINT to EXEC but I wouldn’t recommend it.

DECLARE @KeyWord AS VARCHAR(256)

SET @KeyWord = 'PLACEHOLDER'
SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Job TABLE (JobName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @JobName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @JobName = ''

INSERT INTO @Job (JobName)
SELECT j.NAME
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS j
WHERE j.[enabled] = 1
	AND j.NAME LIKE '%' + @KeyWord + '%' 
ORDER BY j.NAME ASC

WHILE @JobName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @JobName = (
			SELECT MIN(JobName)
			FROM @Job
			WHERE JobName > @JobName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_update_job @job_name = ' + '''' + @JobName + '''' + '
	,@enabled = 0; 
'

	PRINT @Sql
END

How to run all enabled SQL Server Jobs with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to test changes on a development environment.

Running the script will output the T-Sql required to run all jobs on the SQL Server instance. Just copy the text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute. You could change the PRINT to EXEC but I wouldn’t recommend it.

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Job TABLE (JobName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @JobName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @JobName = ''

INSERT INTO @Job (JobName)
SELECT j.NAME
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS j
WHERE j.[enabled] = 1
ORDER BY j.NAME ASC

WHILE @JobName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @JobName = (
			SELECT MIN(JobName)
			FROM @Job
			WHERE JobName > @JobName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_start_job @job_name = ' + '''' + @JobName + '''' + '; 
'
	PRINT @Sql
END

How to delete all SQL Server Jobs that have no maintenance plan with T-Sql

I’d really recommend not running the output of this script on a live environment! This is just a little something I whipped up to clear out a development environment.

Running the script will output the T-Sql required to deleted all jobs on the SQL Server instance. Jobs for maintenance plans are not included as maintenance plans need to be deleted first. Just copy the text and paste into a new SSMS window and execute. You could change the PRINT to EXEC but I wouldn’t recommend it. 

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @Job TABLE (JobName SYSNAME)
DECLARE @JobName AS SYSNAME
DECLARE @Sql AS VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @JobName = ''

INSERT INTO @Job (JobName)
SELECT j.Name
FROM msdb.dbo.sysjobs AS j
LEFT JOIN msdb.dbo.sysmaintplan_subplans AS p ON j.job_id = p.job_id
WHERE p.subplan_id IS NULL
ORDER BY j.Name ASC

WHILE @JobName IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
	SET @JobName = (
			SELECT MIN(JobName)
			FROM @Job
			WHERE JobName > @JobName
			)
	SET @Sql = '
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_delete_job @job_name = ' + '''' + @JobName + '''' + '; 
'
	PRINT @Sql
END

How to clear SQL Server backup and job history

SQL Server makes a record of each backup and restore it performs. This information is recorded across the following tables:

msdb.dbo.backupfile
msdb.dbo.backupfilegroup
msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily
msdb.dbo.backupmediaset
msdb.dbo.backupset
msdb.dbo.restorefile
msdb.dbo.restorefilegroup
msdb.dbo.restorehistory

There is no cleanup process that automatically clears these records down so as you can imagine over time it could grow to be substantial.

Before you upgrade a SQL Server instance if any of these tables exceeds 10,000 rows this can cause an upgrade to hang so it is recommended the older records be deleted.

To reduce rows in all of these tables, you can run the sp_delete_backuphistory stored procedure. This procedure deletes the entries in all of the backup and restore history tables for backup sets older than a specified date. An example is shown below:

EXEC msdb..sp_delete_backuphistory ‘20161201 12:00:00.000’

Similarly to remove records from msdb.dbo.sysjobhistory you can run the following example as shown below:

EXEC msdb..sp_purge_jobhistory @oldest_date = ‘20161201 12:00:00.000’

It is recommended you set up a job to clear these tables however how often you clear them requires some thought. For instance you may want to keep, or archive, the job history for performance comparisons over time or as a record of job failures.

Another example is I use a stored procedure that automatically generates TSQL to perform restores. This stored procedure uses the records in the backup history tables to generate the TSQL. Therefore I need to be careful I do not delete records that are within our backup file retention time period otherwise I would not be able to generate a restore script for those backup files using the stored procedure.

You might be reliant on these tables as well in some way so keep this in mind.

How to capture command prompt output and write it to text file

Say you have a batch script that you run that throws back information you want to keep. Well maybe the best way to do that is to have the output written to a text file. This technique can then be combined with a task scheduler so you have an  automated task that creates a log file.

The below batch script below has two main parts. The first part creates a file to capture the command output. The second part is the command prompt command to run.

Creating the file takes the following 2 parameters:

  • filePath: Where you want the file written, defaulted to your desktop
  • baseName: What the file will be called exclusive of a time stamp, defaulted to Output

The script will then take these parameters to create the parameter fileName, which combines the directory location, with what you want the file to be called along with a time stamp, e.g. User\Desktop\Output20170213111157

The command prompt command goes between the parenthesis (). The results of this command will be written to the file.

@ECHO off
REM SET FILE OUTPUT DIRECTORY
SET "filePath=%USERPROFILE%\Desktop\"
REM SET THE BASE OF THE NAME FOR THE OUTPUT FILE 
SET "baseName=Output"
REM CREATE TIMESTAMP
SET timeStamp=%date:~6,8%%date:~3,2%%date:~0,2%%time:~0,2%%time:~3,2%%time:~6,2%
REM CREATE VARIABLE TO HOLD FILENAME WITH A TIMESTAMP
SET "fileNameStamp=%baseName%%Timestamp%"
SET "fileName=%filePath%%fileNameStamp%"
REM CAPTURE COMMAND OUTPUT TO TEXT FILE
> %fileName%.txt (
REM This is where the commands go!
ECHO Text Captured
)

The following working example captures your computer network information and writes it to the file NetworkInfo(time stamp) on your desktop.

@ECHO off
REM SET FILE OUTPUT DIRECTORY
SET "filePath=%USERPROFILE%\Desktop\"
REM SET THE BASE OF THE NAME FOR THE OUTPUT FILE 
SET "baseName=NetworkInfo"
REM CREATE TIMESTAMP
SET timeStamp=%date:~6,8%%date:~3,2%%date:~0,2%%time:~0,2%%time:~3,2%%time:~6,2%
REM CREATE VARIABLE TO HOLD FILENAME WITH A TIMESTAMP
SET "fileNameStamp=%baseName%%Timestamp%"
SET "fileName=%filePath%%fileNameStamp%"
REM CAPTURE COMMAND OUTPUT TO TEXT FILE
> %fileName%.txt (
REM This is where the commands go!
echo Checking your network information, Please wait...

systeminfo | findstr /c:"Host Name" 
systeminfo | findstr /c:"Domain"

ipconfig /all | find "Physical Address" 

ipconfig | find "IPv4" 
ipconfig | find "Default Gateway"
)

How to increase the performance of your Android TV Stick

So basically all android TV sticks (ATS’s), boxes and any other android device you connect to your TV has been somewhat hacked together to deliver a product the Android OS wasn’t explicitly designed for. (Not that it doesn’t do a great job)

The Android OS was designed for mobile devices but what constitutes a mobile device?

Well one can differentiate a mobile device as a mobile device by two distinguishing characteristics, one it has a built-in display and two it’ll be battery powered.

Android mini computers have neither.

As mentioned above ATS’s use a TV for the display and often ATS’s don’t have the drivers needed to recognised touch screen inputs. No touch screen inputs can have its drawbacks but the focus in this article is on the influence of not having a battery.

Android devices are constantly doing a juggling act between making the device run as fast and be as responsive as possible and not burning through the battery.

This balancing is primarily directed by the CPU governor. The Linux kernel has a number of CPU frequency governors, which can be looked on as rules that set the CPU frequency based on the selected governor and usage patterns. The frequency or clock rate is typically used as an indicator of the processor’s speed, i.e. how quickly it processes tasks. It is measured in the SI unit hertz. The higher the speed the better the performance and the worse the power consumption.

The best thing about the governors is that they have pre-sets, when the “performance” governor is active, the CPU frequency will be set to its maximum value, the “powersave” governor sets the CPU to its lowest frequency, the “ondemand” governor sets the CPU frequency depending on the current usage, etc.

But here’s the important part, because an ATS has no battery and it’s being power by the mains, there’s no need to set the governor to go easy on power consumption. So the governor should be set to performance at all times but by default (the device thinking it’s mobile) it’s probably not.

So how do you change the governor?

Well like everything else with android you use an app of course!

Note: You cannot change your CPU governor unless your phone is rooted and you have a ROM or app that lets you make a change. Also, different kernels (the intermediary software between your phone’s hardware and the operating system) offer different sets of governors.

There are several to choose from:

  • CPU tuner
  • No-frills CPU control
  • SetCPU
  • See here for more

I use CPU tuner as pictured below.

cpuTuner

Simply install CPU Tuner and set profile to “Performance” and Governor to “Full Speed” and you should be getting a little extra juice from your device.

Slán